Art Exhibit - Gastón Garreaud: Tribute to César Vallejo

  • Embassy of Peru 1700 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest Washington, DC, 20036 United States

Gastón Garreaud, (1934-2005), was a renowned self-taught Peruvian artist and aviator. Garreaud studied in Italy and France between 1956 and 1959, and dedicated part of his life to experimenting in painting three-dimensional shapes using pre-Columbian artifacts (pottery and textiles). This unique style of artistic expression aroused great interest in both his native Peru and abroad, which led to an exhibit of his work at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, DC in 1966.
Throughout his life, Garreaud developed his figurative work in the areas of drawing, engraving, and exploring the monotype technique, which he forged into his own artistic style. One body of this artistic work was dedicated to the Peruvian poet César Vallejo (Tribute to César Vallejo). One of Garreaud´s drawings from the César Vallejo series was selected for the issue of the commemorative coin and postage stamp marking the centennial of the poet’s birth.
Garreaud’s original work on César Vallejo was first exhibited in the Ivonne Briceño Gallery, Lima, Peru in 1975. Part of this work has also been exhibited in the San Marcos University Museum, Lima, Peru; the Casa de las Américas, Havana, Cuba; the UNESCO, Paris, France; and the National Library of México, México City (D.F.). A major posthumous exhibition of Garreaud’s works was also presented at the Peruvian-North American Cultural Institute (ICPNA) in Miraflores, Lima in 2008.

Garreaud’s drawings and monotypes of nudes are characterized by their clean and agile strokes creating sensual and playful feminine forms that exude a poetic eroticism.

40 years ago, in 1975 Garreaud created the iconic series of drawings and monotypes in honor of Cesar Vallejo, the “Vallejiana” affiliation remained a constant in his life. December 6th of this year marks the 10th anniversary of this self-made artist’s death, who dedicated his life highlighting the many facets of Peruvian culture